How to Use Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Use these files and videos to learn how to use Adobe Premiere Pro CC to edit a short documentary.








Watch these videos to learn the basics of how to use Premiere Pro CC to edit a short documentary:
(Follow along using the exercise files in Premiere Pro CC)
First, create your new Premiere Pro project.

The first step in creating any video in Premiere Pro is to create a new project. In this video, you’ll create the project and set up your workspace so you can start pulling together the nature story.

Import the nature photos and media into the project.

Now you’ll bring photos, video, and audio files of the bald eagles into your project. Then you’ll use the Project panel to preview the imported video clips, view information about imported media assets, and organize the assets for use in future video tutorials.

Create a sequence or timeline and add audio.

Now that you have set up the project and imported media assets, you’re ready to start adding these assets to the project. You’ll also bring in a couple of audio tracks to make your video come to life. You’ll adjust the volume of the music and narration to make them sound great together.

YouTube Video

Assemble a rough cut.

In this video, you’ll add in and out points to your video clips and use markers to add shots to your project. You’ll learn how easy it is to make changes — such as extending a shot, changing edit points by adding a rolling edit, and adjusting the beginning and end frame using the Slip tool.

By the way, don’t worry about the picture size right now. The imported photos appear cropped when viewed in the timeline. You’ll get to fix that later in this tutorial.

Add a title to your video.

Now it’s time to add a title to your video. This helps engage your audience and set their expectations. In this tutorial, you will use the titler to create and style a title asset. You’ll then add the title to the timeline.

Enhance your video with effects and transitions.

If not done to excess, using effects and transitions can improve the look of your video and give it a more professional feel. In this video tutorial, you’ll make some simple exposure, color, and tonal adjustments to your video. You’ll apply transitions between clips to help convey changes in time or location between the video shots. As a bonus, you’ll use keyframes to animate a pan and zoom on one of the photos.

Note: Because the imported photos have a higher resolution than the imported videos, they will appear cropped when viewed on the timeline. At 5:12 in this video, I show you how to scale the photos to match the videos on the timeline. The newer Set to Frame Size command preserves the full resolution of the photos without rasterizing them. Either option will work here but I wanted you to know about the more recent media resizing command available in Premiere Pro.

Export your first completed video.

The final step of any Premiere Pro project is exporting it to a final video. Many video formats are supported. In this video tutorial, you’ll learn about some common formats, presets, and settings and then export your video.

And that’s it — you’ve finished your first project! We hope that you learned the basics of Premiere Pro and that you will start creating more videos using what you learned.